Archive for the ‘diy’ Category

Toner Transfer and Muriatic Acid Etchant: Making PCBs at LVL1


Originally posted on my personal blog, Meat and Networking.

LVL1 is great.  A place for creative and motivated people to get together and goad each-other into doing more creative things.  It’s also a great gathering place for tools, as well as knowledge.  A few months ago, the spoiled electrical engineer that I am, I never would have considered making my own PCBs.  Any project worth taking off the breadboard was worth sending to China to get made “right.”

Of course, there isn’t always time and money to send something to China.  Today’s installment is the Sumo-bot board I’m trying to put together for the Hive13 sumobot competition.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like poor Snoopy bot will make it to the ring, but the board making process itself is worth talking about.

Laying out a PCB using software like Eagle is beyond the scope of this post.  If you can follow the appropriate Sparkfun Tutorial, it’s pretty easy to pick up.  Something to note:  for single sided home-made PCBs, put all traces and surface mount components on the BOTTOM layer.  Put any necessary jumpers on the top layer.  When you’re ready to print, just turn off all the layers you don’t want turned into copper.


Are you a maker?


Dale Dougherty, Make Magazine publisher did this nice Ted talk on Makers. If you are ever looking for a good way to tell people what LVL1 is all about, have them watch this video. BTW, Dale is from Louisville and visited our Hackerspace last summer.

Car-B-Gone workshop TODAY


We are having a Car-B-Gone workshop at the space this afternoon. Sorry we did not get the Eventbright announcement up. Just show up to build your very own Car-B-Gone tonight at 8-ish. If you do not know what a Car-B-Gone is… it is another fine Mitch Altman project. Read about it here

Following the Car-B-Gone workshop will be the ever popular Beer-B-Gone workshop. Hope to see everyone there.


The Fifty Dollar Sumobot Challenge, Part I

Many readers of this blog have probably either built a mini-Sumobot or watched one in a mini-Sumobot competition.  They are works of art, a tight little bundle of power, sensors and control, with one task in mind: push the other little bugger off the mat.  The designs on these little bots vary widely in design as well as performance.  Did I mention that they can be expensive?  Even ready to make kits are over $100 shipped to your door.  And if you are going to buy a lot of specialized parts online including the right motors, wheels, sensors and a brain can cost you a fair amount.

LVL1 Hackerspace
1205 E. Washington St.
Louisville, KY 40206