Skip to content

2

I ordered another print from Shapeways and after some volcano-related delays, it finally arrived. Another good experience from Shapeways. Now that Sketchup 7.1 can do Collada exports, the process is easier but still, it does not have power tools for mesh editing, so it sometimes can be difficult creating a watertight model that passes Shapeways' checks. Each 2-part case was a bit over $3 in "White, Strong and Flexible" material. (They're small) and shipping for orders over $25 is free. ...continue reading "Shapeways for electronics cases"

This is a repost of the Google Groups announcement.

The hunt is on! We've crossed off some of the more
expensive options already. But we have a few contenders in the
running. Here's the our wiki page with the contenders with links back
to their discussion threads:

http://wiki.lvl1.org/Possible_locations

So here's how we're going to make a decision.. Starting next meeting,
a quorum of our members will rank all the scouted options from most
preferable to least preferable. Results will be tallied to determine
the most preferred location. At that point, we have a brief discussion
about *only* the top pick. Whomever shows up, members and non-members,
can advocate for it or against it. Then members will follow that with
a vote to either "Pull the trigger on this location" OR "Pass until
next meeting" We will do this at every meeting henceforth, rinse and
repeat, until we get a space.

If you have a space in mind, it's important to get it scouted before
the next meeting. No one can know if a decision will be reached next
meeting or not. Every meeting is a big meeting from now on... until we
are meeting at our new location!

My sincerest gratitude and appreciation goes out to everyone who has
contributed financially and otherwise. Progress doesn't happen unless
people make it happen. And at every step you all have made it happen!
We'll have a space soon! And we're just getting started...

The SALAMANDER triple sensor boards arrived and are under construction by students in the Gadget Lab at the University of Louisville. We used a laser-cut mylar stencil from Pololu to stencil solder paste onto the pads, then students placed the parts and we reflowed the solder on a hotplate. These boards were previously hand-soldered, but we need 50 of them for the summer so that had to change. If you're considering the hotplate method, it is very very good and you should try it. The Gadget Lab has a fancy "lab" hotplate but I have just acquired the $20 Target skillet and will try it soon with that. We do all the surface-mount parts this way, then stick on a few through-hole connectors. The staggered SparkFun connector footprint does hold the connectors in place nicely (though much better for the 3-pin ones than the 2-pin parts) Now we have 27 working boards, and the bottleneck has moved to testing and sensor calibration. One person's bottleneck is another person's summer research project!

Here's some video of the Klee sequencer in action. Along with details on finishing up from previous posts. Continued from

So we left off with a PCB ready to go. I used my trusty tin snips to cleanly cut off the excess board. It's a tight fit underneath the panel.
Trimmed panel

...continue reading "Finishing the custom front panel Klee"